A New Look at Pain.


Body in Mind

The Reign of Pain is mainly in the Brain.

A Happy Brain feels less Pain.

I am Safe.

Pain depends on the Balance of Danger and Safety cues.

                                                     In                In

                                                     Me              me

What is lacking? Loving support.

When I first moved into my unit at the Retirement Village I felt very alone.

Money was a big issue.

Then, I fell out of the bed I had borrowed from Management, banging my arm and foot against a nearby desk. This caused shock and considerable pain and bruising. The ambulance attended and I was advised to see the GP next morning.

Thankfully, no bones were broken but I continued to have severe back, leg and knee pain. On investigation by specialists, I learned my back was a mess of problems, untreatable and prescribed codeine based painkillers. 

I have been on the waiting list for the pain clinic at the Royal Hospital Hobart since November 2016.

This year the Government have decided that taking opioid based medications, even on prescription only basis, is not a good treatment so the GP tried to cut me off “cold turkey” with  the result I ended up in hospital with uncontrolled high blood pressure.

So, next thing I tried is laser acupuncture every week for about 3 months. At the same time, weaning myself gradually from the pills.

Then the Pain Revolution Team rode their bicycles into town to teach the latest theories about pain www.painrevolution.org 

The Local Pain Educator Program is a community based health promotion initiative that helps raise awareness of educational models for pain relief in a biosychosocial model of care.

From this teaching I have learned to find alternative ways to tell my body that I am SAFE now. I don’t need pain to protect me. I can change my thoughts, beliefs, peers and fears of past events.

The relationship between the body, the brain and the mind is complex and magnificent, which is why lots of people are investigating it. This website focuses on attempts to better understand the way the body, brain and mind interact.

Research into the role of the brain and mind in chronic pain

BJSM British Journal Sports Medicine

The lead scientist, Prof. Lorimer Moseley, is particularly interested in the role of the brain and mind in chronic and complex pain disorders. Through collaborations with clinicians, scientists, patients and thoughtful friends, the team is exploring how the brain and its representation of the body change when pain persists, how the mind influences physiological regulation of the body, how the changes in the brain and mind can be normalised via treatment, and how we can teach people about it all in a way that is both interesting and accurate.

 This website includes links to published articles, current projects, teaching resources for clinicians and lecturers, books, seminars and conferences and other info that the team thinks is intriguing, important or irresistible.

The Body in Mind team includes collaborators in research experiments and clinical trials, bloggers who are kind enough to contribute to the BiM blog, and our research team at Neuroscience Research Australia (NeuRA) and University of South Australia (UniSA).

Professor Lorimer Moseley

Professor Lorimer Moseley is a clinical scientist investigating pain in humans. After posts at The University of Oxford, UK, and the University of Sydney, Lorimer was appointed Foundation Professor of Neuroscience and Chair in Physiotherapy, The Sansom Institute for Health Research at the University of South Australia. He is also Senior Principal Research Fellow at NeuRA and an NHMRC Principal Research Fellow.

He has published over 280 articles, five books and numerous book chapters. He has given over 140 keynote or invited presentations at interdisciplinary meetings in 30 countries and has provided professional education in pain sciences to over 15,000 medical and health practitioners and public lectures to 35,000. His research group outreach videos and articles have attracted over 3.5 million views/reads.

Lorimer Moseley PhD FACP

University of South Australia, Australia

Public Transport a part of living for Elders.

Professor Lorimer Moseley (PT, PhD) is Chair of Physiotherapy at the University of South Australia and a professor of Clinical Neurosciences. people.unisa.edu.au/lorimer.moseley

He combines Oxford rigour with a laconic and very popular Australian style of communication. In this podcast he addresses the questions: 

What’s new in our understanding of the spinal cord? 

What should we be telling patients? 

Is the ‘hands on, hands off’ debate a useful one? 

How do you feel the profession is performing right now? 

On the subject of what should we be telling patients, he argues we should train them to ask clinicians 3 questions. 

1. How do I know my pain system is over-protective?

2. What can I do to retrain my system to be less protective?

3. Am I safe to move?

You can find his patient website ‘Tame the Beast’ here: www.tamethebeast.org/#home

You can find his academic/health professional website ‘Body in Mind’ here: www.bodyinmind.org/

And is previous BJSM podcast was on tendons. It has had >17K listens: ow.ly/5OGN30gkaD7.

And here is a link to the Pain Revolution website: www.painrevolution.org/

BJSM

BMJ

BMJ Journals

Sports

medicine

3 November 2017

Am I safe to move? Professor Lorimer Moseley: New understanding of pain and focusing on the patient by BMJ talk medicine is licensed under a Creative Commons License.

About


Since I was a small child I have always been puzzled by the question “What is the Meaning of Life?

It has only been in this last year that I have truly had that question answered.

Finding the path between ORDER and CHAOS.

Choosing the positive, with love, and creating equilibrium.

Our ultimate goal is to travel a route that will take us on a long, long journey over a vast period of time, where we will explore the potential of our mind as well as achieve great intellectual conquest, which is reward in itself, but is not the final reward.

There have been steps along the way, through many denominations, starting with Anglican through to small home groups.

Integral theory was a fascinating journey into more truth on my quest.

This is the ultimate quest for us:

to return to where we rightfully belong, and that is to the One who created us, so that we can be One with Him.

I have travelled a long path, experienced much, created a family, run a business, discovered spiritual truths and now in my later years I am living in a Retirement Village in Hobart, almost at the end of everything but happily keeping in touch through modern technology.

Giving up old habits and ways of thinking is required every 10 years or so, otherwise our lives become stale.
Every new chapter creates opportunity for more adventures.

More to life than Bingo


This year 2016 has found me in a new location, Hobart, Tasmania and with a new passion.

I have been studying Jean Gebser’s Ever Present Origin as part of an on-line Book Club,

It is quite an intense but rewarding journey through structures of consciousness.

To me, it seems like a Mythic Journey and here is a poem by my favourite poet that says it all.

Mythic Journey

by John O’Donohue.

A journey can become a sacred thing:

Make sure before you go,

to take the time

to bless your going forth.

To free your heart of ballast.

So that the compass of your soul

might direct you toward

where you will discover

more of your hidden life,

and the urgencies

that deserve to claim you.

Ageing in Place


cakeLiveable Communities, ageing in place in 21st. Century.

The purpose of this article is to identify some of the pressing problems that people face as they age, in particular where and how they live, and to suggest a range of possible solutions.

Ageing in place is a concept which focuses on both where and how an elder lives, self managed, highlighting quality of life issues such as health, housing, transport,safety and opportunities for education, recreation, volunteering and social interaction.

Ageing in place isn’t just a matter of building accommodation. It’s about choices, enabling seniors to stay in their own homes in comfort and security for as long as their health and financial circumstances allow.

Flexible, affordable solutions are required, for the time when an intervention of an illness or unexpected crisis causes a person to require alternative accommodation, often in the same area where their local GP and shops and friends remain.

Some could require assistance from current health services, but remain able to make decisions and enjoy their life, as before.

Frail aged residents would need live-in nursing help and compassionate people to provide relief from loneliness, helplessness and boredom, with eventual palliative care.

The impetus for calling attention to this need comes from first hand experience of our peers:

  • Inability to find residential accommodation in the area after a fall, leading to isolation in a nursing home too far away for friends to visit.
  • No respite care available during the winter months when current housing was unsuitable in order to remain healthy.
  • Sudden illness requiring temporary care, before recuperation and return to home.
  • Relocation of family members to be closer to other family inhibited by cost.
  • Availability of visits from local long standing GP’s desirable.
  • Access to ongoing basic health programmes at clinics in the area.
  • If an Elder, living alone at home, is required to go to hospital the stay is likely to be longer than usual, because no care is available at home after release. Thus costing the State more.
    High security of blocks of flats is an issue. In an emergency, the resident could become inaccessible for care givers.
    Transport is also a big consideration, isolation because of lack of mobility is common. Those who are no longer driving don’t easily enjoy the independence of getting their shopping done or visits to friends or medical appointments.

    Of course, public transport is hardly a panacea for the problems of the frail elderly. Trudging to a bus stop or train station, climbing up stairs and dealing with schedules and bad weather, lack of seats may simply be too demanding. And Community Transport can’t possibly handle the volume that the “silver tsunami” will produce.

    So for many senior boomers, the availability of that bus or train may be the single most important factor in allowing them to live the good life — or, given the realities of ageing, the pretty good life.

We are interested in a place where those who are relatively well and mobile can live long term, and also facilities for those who suddenly and unexpectedly are no longer able to function independently, maybe for a short period.